Thursday, 21 August 2014

Craftsy's Whale of a Flash Sale!

Craftsy's Whale of a Flash Sale: Save Up to 70%!
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Wednesday, 20 August 2014

Let's Bee Social #34

Welcome to this week's Let's Bee Social!  I have happy mail to share!

How fitting that I published my first weekly post for the Top 10 Tips for New Quilters.  This week's subject was Fabric & Thread.  And this came in the mail from Fabric Spot the same day!

These are 3 yards of Small Dots in Grey and 2 yards of Small Dots in Aqua, both by Riley Blake Designs.  Also, 3 yards of Mixed Bag Houndstooth in Sprouts by Moda.



Today I ordered my Widescreen Crosshatch in Pacific through Mad About Patchwork.  And will be just thrilled to be able to get a hold of this wide backing so I can finish up my Giggles UP! quilt.




This top measures 84" x 96".  And I will be offering the pattern when it gets finished and photographed!

Just wanted to let you in on two incredible FREE GIVEAWAYS going on now!!!!






Don't miss out on this GIVEAWAY!!!

It's a FREE Craftsy quilt kit!

Click here for the details!








AND this fabulous GIVEAWAY, sponsored by Fabric Shoppe!!!

You don't want to miss out on this opportunity.
Win a Color Your Stash Club bundle!










NOW.... What's new with you?


http://sewfreshquilts.blogspot.ca/p/lets-bee-social.html

(If you are not sure what Let's Bee Social is all about,
you can read the details here.)








Good Luck in the Giveaways!  Hope you can get some Happy Mail, too!

Keep On Quilting On! 



http://www.bloglovin.com/en/blog/5578781



Craftsy
Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in my posts are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Tuesday, 19 August 2014

Top 10 Tips for New Quilters - Fabric & Thread

Introducing Week 1 of the Top 10 Tips for new Quilters -  Fabric & Thread


Quality Cotton Quilting Fabric:

Three elements are used to determine the quality of cotton quilting fabric: the thread count, the quality of the threads/yarns used, and the finishing processes.

Fabrics with a higher thread count are smoother to the touch and last longer.  Think of when you look for new bed sheets.  A higher thread count equals more comfort and durability.  Good quilting fabric has a thread count of at least 60 threads per inch each on the crosswise and lengthwise grains.

Fabric quality is also determined by the diameter of the yarns used, the size of the cotton filaments and the length of the cotton staple.  These threads/yarns should be even in thickness and have fibers that are at least 1/2" long.

High end quilting fabrics use quality dyes and go through several finishing processes to set these dyes.  For this reason, quality quilting fabrics are not likely to result in colours bleeding when put through the wash cycle.


WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN?

At the beginning of my quilting journey, my frugal nature and inexperience resulted in my purchasing a lot of lower quality fabrics from "big box" chain stores.  Much of that fabric was either thin, stiff or had bumpy threads.  I always prewashed my yardage, so never had an issue with bleeding.  Over time, I began to purchase more fat quarters and precuts and quit prewashing.  Experience with fabric helped me to learn what the better quality fabrics felt like to the touch and how they looked.  Even how nice they smelled!

Do I still love the quilts I made at the beginning?  Of course!  But now I only buy high quality quilting fabric because I know it will last longer, be softer to the touch, and provides me with better value.  That is not to say I will no longer buy fabric from the "big box" stores.   I watch for sales, always check the label on a bolt of fabric to ensure it is made by a reputable company, and use my experience to ensure it is a good buy.



Fabric Grain:

Fabric grain refers to the way threads are woven.  Fabrics are woven in two directions.  These are referred to as the lengthwise and crosswise grains.  However, there are three types of fabric grain.

Lengthwise grain (warp), also known as straight of grain, runs parallel to the selvages.  It is the strongest grain and has very little stretch, making it great for borders.

Crosswise grain (weft), also known as cross grain,  runs at a right angle to the selvages.  It has a little more stretch than the lengthwise grain.

Bias grain runs on a 45-degree angle to the selvages and has the most stretch.  Be careful when handling pieces cut on the bias.  Strips cut on the bias are used for binding curved quilt edges such as scallops.  Bias strips are also used to make stems for applique.



SUPER TIP:  Have you ever purchased a length of fabric that was all wonky when folded with selvage edges together?  To straighten fabric before cutting hold the selvedge edge in one hand and the cut edge in the other. Give it a tug!  This helps to straighten out a piece of fabric.


To prewash or not to prewash?  That is the question...

Today's quality quilting cottons have made prewashing a thing of the past.  It is no longer necessary to prewash your fabrics before use in order to prevent the dyes from bleeding into adjacent fabrics.  However, to be safe, it is always a good idea to use a product like Shout Color Catcher or Dr. Beckmann - Colour & Dirt Collector.  These sheets look a lot like a fabric softener sheet used to eliminate static in the dryer, but are instead thrown into the washing machine with your quilt for it's first washing.  The sheets trap all dyes in the wash water and prevent them from bleeding into your quilt.  Another great product to have handy when washing your quilt is a bottle of synthropol.  After washing your quilt, if you see some bleeding, you can instantly rewash with some synthropol and the bleeding comes out.




Quality Cotton & Polyester Threads:

Well, here again, quality is the main point.  After all the work that goes into making a quilt, you want the thread to hold up to the wear and tear of use.  Both in the piecing and in the quilting.  Cheaper is not better.


Cotton or Polyester?

This will be a personal choice.  And it will depend largely on how well it works in your sewing machine.

Cotton thread is a spun thread.  It is made by spinning lengths of fiber called staples into plies.  The plies are then twisted together.  Measured by thread count number and plies, the thread count is the thickness of each strand and the ply tells you how many strands are wound together to make the thread.  General cotton sewing thread is typically 50/3, where the thread thickness is 50 and there are 3 strands of thread woven together make the plies.  The higher the first number the thinner the thread.

Quality cotton thread uses long staple fibers and is mercerized.  This results in a smoother thread which is less linty, gives it strength, and helps the dye absorb properly.  However, cotton will wear more than synthetic threads and isn't as colorfast.

Polyester thread can be spun or continuous filament.  Although spun polyester is made in the same way as cotton thread, it is a synthetic blend which is stronger and stretchier and has little or no lint.  Monofilament thread is even stronger and is made from one continuous filament.  Polyester threads come in a variety of weights.  A greater weight number indicates a thinner thread.  Typically, you would use a 40 weight for embroidery or quilting.




WHAT DO I PREFER? 

I only use polyester thread.  Gutermann and Superior Threads are my threads of choice.  I prefer polyester because it has a higher tensile strength and is less likely to break.  It is strong, durable, and colorfast and is less linty than cotton.  I use a white Gutermann thread for piecing and often also use it for quilting.  But when I really want the quilting to stand out and shine, I turn to my collection of Superior Threads.  I love my Magnifico and Fantastico threads.




A word, or two, about Specialty Threads:
brought to you by Judy of Quilt Paradigum

Hi everyone! I was so excited when Lorna asked me to write up a little blurb on metallic thread! When I decided to use metallic thread in my most recent project, I thought I must be crazy to sign up for such frustration! I did a little research before starting which, in the end, saved me from some more gray hair. Really, the right set up and knowing the ins and outs of purchasing the correct thread will make your life SO much easier!! I recently finished a family tree whole cloth quilt in which I used all metallic thread. I haven't posted it on my blog because it has not been gifted yet :) I'll be posting all about it later in September! Here are some tips that made my first foray into metallic pretty painless and wanting to do more!

1. Watch these two short Youtube videos put out by Superior Threads. Superior Bob (that's what I call him, LOVE this man!) gives some great tips on what to look for when buying metallic thread and tips on sewing with metallic thread. And of course he throws in a few laughs along the way :) Part 1 and Part 2. I am not compensated by or connected to Superior Threads. Just wanted to make that clear. :)

2. Set up of tension is key! Bob talks about tension and on the Superior metallic thread spools it says to set tension at 1 and also recommends using a top stitch 90/14 needle. I was dubious about the tension and I am a believer in trying it out on a practice piece to get it right. Turns out that 1 is exactly what my machine liked. I still think it is important to test in on your machine - machines are all different have have different preferences on how they want to be treated! It will be very obvious when you have hit the sweet spot for tension - your sewing line will look MUCH more metallic.

3. What I found quite by accident is, setting up how the thread is feeding off the spool is key too! Once I had the right set up, I had not one thread break! Make sure the thread is feeding directly off the spool - not off of the top of spool. Here are pictures to hopefully make that clearer :)



4.  Bob mentions this in the video and I think it deserves a repeat, use a stronger thread in the bobbin. If the job requires metallic thread in the bobbin, go slow. I used Isocord which is a poly thread in my bobbin. Honestly, it was chosen because those were the spools in my stash that matched. It worked well but probably not any better than a cotton thread would have.

And here is my quilt all washed and blocked. I was nervous about washing too but had to due to marking and it came through the wash beautifully!


There are a little more than two 500 yd. spools of metallic thread in the quilt. I think I have conquered my fear of metallic thread!


I used my machine's monograms to put this on the binding. I went REALLY slow and had no issues... Isn't that sparkle cool?? :)

I really hope you give metallic thread a try! And thank you so much, Lorna for asking me to share my experience with metallic thread!

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Thank you so much, Judy, for providing such great advice on using metallic thread.  And for sharing these amazing pictures of your gorgeous whole cloth quilt!  I am a big fan of genealogy and this quilt is Sew Inspirational!!!


Thank you to all my readers as well.  If you have any other tips or advice to share, please leave a comment!

And remember to.....

Keep On Quilting On!






Craftsy

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in my posts are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Quilting Supplies at Craftsy.com
Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in my posts are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”